Thursday, 12 November 2015

Explore 4,500 British Museum artifacts with Google's help

The British Museum in London holds an array of beautiful and historically significant artifacts including the Rosetta Stone, which helped historians to understand the ancient hieroglyphics used in Egypt. Today, the organisation is teaming up with Google to bring its various collections online as part of the Google Cultural Institute. The search giant has been developing this resource for years by continually visiting and archiving exhibits around the world. With the British Museum, an extra 4,500 objects and artworks are being added to its collection, complete with detailed photos and descriptions.
The most important addition is arguably the Admonitions Scroll, a Chinese text which dates back to the 6th-century. The piece is incredibly fragile, so it's only visible in the museum for a few months each year. Through the Cultural Institute, you can take a peek whenever you like -- and because it's been captured at "gigapixel" resolution you can zoom in to see some extraordinary details. All of the objects are searchable on Google's site, along with a couple of curated collections about ancient Egypt and Celtic life in the British Iron Age.
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Friday, 23 October 2015

Battle of Agincourt: 10 reasons why the French lost to Henry V's army

The Battle of Agincourt is often heralded as one of the greatest English military victories. Here are ten reasons why King Henry V's army was able to defeat a French force four times its size.

The Battle of Agincourt was a major victory for England in the Hundred Years' War, and took place Friday, 25 October 1415.
The battle was heralded in Shakespeare's Henry V in which the king urges his "band of brothers" to stand together.
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Three new important items from the Castles Studies Trust

The Castles Studies Trust has provided details of three new important items:

1) A digital model of Gleaston Castle in Cumbria, showing the current state of the ruins.

Find out more here...

2) A press release about work at Tibbers Castle in Dumfriesshire, enhancing our understanding of the castle's early history

Find out more here...

3) A short video about the landscape of Wressle Castle in Yorkshire 

Sunday, 12 July 2015

Digital Reconstruction of Holt Castle

Robbed of stone to build Eaton Hall in C17, little today remains of the Edwardian castle of Holt a favourite of Richard II’s. Towards the end of his reign it became Richard’s royal treasury storing an estimated 100,000 marks (£66,000) just before his downfall.

Funded by the Castle Studies Trust, leading experts Rick Turner and Chris Jones-Jenkins have digitally reconstructed Holt in great detail both internally and externally which has been converted into a video fly-through to reveal what the castle was like at its zenith in the late C15

To see the video please go here:: 

This amazing work was done by combining their extensive knowledge and expertise with a variety of historical sources such as inventories, antiquarian drawings and plans as well as the results of recent excavations.

Project leader Rick Turner says:

“It has been great fun trying to solve the disappearance of this once famous castle. All the different pieces of evidence have had to be assessed and reconciled. The most important is what survives at the crime scene itself, the visible remains and what has been found in recent excavations. Old plan and views have been helpful in rebuilding the lost parts, though at times the information they give is contradictory. Visualizing what the documentary sources are describing has been a real challenge. We hope that we have done this impressive and complex castle justice.”

Castle Studies Trust Co-Patron John Goodall:

“This project has helped reconstruct in vivid detail the splendour of a major castle that has been lost for nearly four hundred years. The video fly-through will not only help people understand what this unusual and sophisticated building looked like, but also how it would have functioned as a working building, something that is impossible in its current condition.”

Watch the Video...

Wednesday, 8 July 2015

You(r) Archaeology – portraying the past

“You(r) Archaeology – portraying the past” - A European competition to express your view.

What is archaeology? An adventure? A pain in the neck? The appeal of the past, the magic of marvellous sites, the boredom of a dusty museum? Probably all of these together, and still more.

Up until July 31st 2015, all European citizens can answer the question and tell us about their idea of archaeology by entering a drawing, painting, photo or video in the European competition “You(r) Archaeology”.

Further details...

Thursday, 16 April 2015

History in the making as first dig at Halton Castle in nearly 30 years announced

Halton Castle is to host its first archaeological dig in nearly 30 years and residents have been invited to take part.
More than 50 archaeology fans packed into a Runcorn church hall on Tuesday night to find out details about the first excavation at Halton Castle in nearly 30 years.
The dig is due to take place in July and will give residents a chance to take part in uncovering the secrets hidden beneath the soil.
St Mary’s Church Hall on Castle Road hosted the meeting.
Participants will receive basic training under the guidance of professional archaeologists from Salford University.
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Thursday, 26 March 2015

Richard III DNA tests uncover evidence of further royal scandal

Latest genetic tests reveal another break in the male line, potentially undermining the legitimacy of the entire House of Plantagenet

When scientists revealed last year that an adulterous affair had apparently broken the male line in Richard III’s family tree, they vowed to investigate further.
But rather than clear up the mystery, their latest genetic tests have uncovered evidence of another royal sex scandal. This time, the indiscretion could potentially undermine the legitimacy of the entire House of Plantagenet.
The skeleton of Richard III, the last Plantagenet king, was discovered under a car park in Leicester in 2012. His identity was confirmed through his mitochondrial DNA, passed down through the maternal line from his sister to two relatives alive today.
But further DNA tests soon uncovered evidence of a family secret. It emerged when researchers at Leicester University compared the Y chromosomes of Richard III and five anonymous male relatives of Henry Somerset (1744-1803), who claim descent from Edward III, the great great grandfather of Richard III.
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