Monday, 14 December 2015

Norman castle remains found under Gloucester prison


The remains of a Norman castle similar to the Tower of London have been found buried under the court of a disused prison. 


The remains of a medieval keep have been discovered under the exercise yard and  basketball court of Gloucester Prison. Archaeologists say the keep, which had  walls up to 12 feet wide and measured around 100 feet in length, would  have resembled the Tower of London
[Credit: Andrew Higgins/SWINS] 

The old walls of the keep, dating back to 1110, were unearthed by archaeologists investigating the site in the centre of Gloucester before it is redeveloped. 

The castle was the first in Gloucester to be built of stone and housed three chapels, two drawbridges and a royal chamber for both the King and Queen. 

Neil Holbrook, chief executive of Cotswold Archaeology, said: "I am surprised by what we found.

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Thursday, 12 November 2015

Explore 4,500 British Museum artifacts with Google's help


The British Museum in London holds an array of beautiful and historically significant artifacts including the Rosetta Stone, which helped historians to understand the ancient hieroglyphics used in Egypt. Today, the organisation is teaming up with Google to bring its various collections online as part of the Google Cultural Institute. The search giant has been developing this resource for years by continually visiting and archiving exhibits around the world. With the British Museum, an extra 4,500 objects and artworks are being added to its collection, complete with detailed photos and descriptions.
The most important addition is arguably the Admonitions Scroll, a Chinese text which dates back to the 6th-century. The piece is incredibly fragile, so it's only visible in the museum for a few months each year. Through the Cultural Institute, you can take a peek whenever you like -- and because it's been captured at "gigapixel" resolution you can zoom in to see some extraordinary details. All of the objects are searchable on Google's site, along with a couple of curated collections about ancient Egypt and Celtic life in the British Iron Age.
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Friday, 23 October 2015

Battle of Agincourt: 10 reasons why the French lost to Henry V's army


The Battle of Agincourt is often heralded as one of the greatest English military victories. Here are ten reasons why King Henry V's army was able to defeat a French force four times its size.

The Battle of Agincourt was a major victory for England in the Hundred Years' War, and took place Friday, 25 October 1415.
The battle was heralded in Shakespeare's Henry V in which the king urges his "band of brothers" to stand together.
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Three new important items from the Castles Studies Trust

The Castles Studies Trust has provided details of three new important items:

1) A digital model of Gleaston Castle in Cumbria, showing the current state of the ruins.

Find out more here...

2) A press release about work at Tibbers Castle in Dumfriesshire, enhancing our understanding of the castle's early history

Find out more here...

3) A short video about the landscape of Wressle Castle in Yorkshire 

Sunday, 12 July 2015

Digital Reconstruction of Holt Castle


Robbed of stone to build Eaton Hall in C17, little today remains of the Edwardian castle of Holt a favourite of Richard II’s. Towards the end of his reign it became Richard’s royal treasury storing an estimated 100,000 marks (£66,000) just before his downfall.

Funded by the Castle Studies Trust, leading experts Rick Turner and Chris Jones-Jenkins have digitally reconstructed Holt in great detail both internally and externally which has been converted into a video fly-through to reveal what the castle was like at its zenith in the late C15

To see the video please go here:: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wv_sHru_OG0 

This amazing work was done by combining their extensive knowledge and expertise with a variety of historical sources such as inventories, antiquarian drawings and plans as well as the results of recent excavations.

Project leader Rick Turner says:

“It has been great fun trying to solve the disappearance of this once famous castle. All the different pieces of evidence have had to be assessed and reconciled. The most important is what survives at the crime scene itself, the visible remains and what has been found in recent excavations. Old plan and views have been helpful in rebuilding the lost parts, though at times the information they give is contradictory. Visualizing what the documentary sources are describing has been a real challenge. We hope that we have done this impressive and complex castle justice.”

Castle Studies Trust Co-Patron John Goodall:

“This project has helped reconstruct in vivid detail the splendour of a major castle that has been lost for nearly four hundred years. The video fly-through will not only help people understand what this unusual and sophisticated building looked like, but also how it would have functioned as a working building, something that is impossible in its current condition.”

Watch the Video...

Wednesday, 8 July 2015

You(r) Archaeology – portraying the past


“You(r) Archaeology – portraying the past” - A European competition to express your view.

What is archaeology? An adventure? A pain in the neck? The appeal of the past, the magic of marvellous sites, the boredom of a dusty museum? Probably all of these together, and still more.

Up until July 31st 2015, all European citizens can answer the question and tell us about their idea of archaeology by entering a drawing, painting, photo or video in the European competition “You(r) Archaeology”.

Further details...

Thursday, 16 April 2015

History in the making as first dig at Halton Castle in nearly 30 years announced

Halton Castle is to host its first archaeological dig in nearly 30 years and residents have been invited to take part.
More than 50 archaeology fans packed into a Runcorn church hall on Tuesday night to find out details about the first excavation at Halton Castle in nearly 30 years.
The dig is due to take place in July and will give residents a chance to take part in uncovering the secrets hidden beneath the soil.
St Mary’s Church Hall on Castle Road hosted the meeting.
Participants will receive basic training under the guidance of professional archaeologists from Salford University.
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Thursday, 26 March 2015

Richard III DNA tests uncover evidence of further royal scandal

Latest genetic tests reveal another break in the male line, potentially undermining the legitimacy of the entire House of Plantagenet


When scientists revealed last year that an adulterous affair had apparently broken the male line in Richard III’s family tree, they vowed to investigate further.
But rather than clear up the mystery, their latest genetic tests have uncovered evidence of another royal sex scandal. This time, the indiscretion could potentially undermine the legitimacy of the entire House of Plantagenet.
The skeleton of Richard III, the last Plantagenet king, was discovered under a car park in Leicester in 2012. His identity was confirmed through his mitochondrial DNA, passed down through the maternal line from his sister to two relatives alive today.
But further DNA tests soon uncovered evidence of a family secret. It emerged when researchers at Leicester University compared the Y chromosomes of Richard III and five anonymous male relatives of Henry Somerset (1744-1803), who claim descent from Edward III, the great great grandfather of Richard III.
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Monday, 23 March 2015

Richard III returns to Bosworth Field for final time


The last time Richard III was at Bosworth Field the outcome proved less than satisfactory for the King.
The battle, which was the last significant skirmish in the War of the Roses, saw Richard not only lose the English throne but also his life.
According to contemporaneous accounts, the dead monarch was stripped naked, slung over a horse and led back to Leicester, his skull banging against Bow Bridge as it was brought into the city. He was the last English king to die in battle.
Today Richard will have a more dignified entrance to Leicester when his body returns in ceremony within a custom-made coffin, borne on a gun carriage.
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Monday, 23 February 2015

Medieval battle site yields UK’s oldest cannon ball


A lead ball found at a medieval battle site could be the oldest surviving cannonball in England, an expert says. 


The lead cannon ball is believed to have bounced at least twice and possibly hit a tree  [Credit: Northampton Battlefield Society] 

The damaged ball was found at the site of the Battle of Northampton fought during the War of the Roses. 

Medieval artillery expert Dr Glenn Foard said: "It is highly likely the projectile was fired during the battle [10 July 1460]." 

It will be revealed to the public at a Northampton hotel in Eagle Drive close to the battlefield on Thursday night.

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New film footage reveals potential 'killer blow' to King Richard III


New film footage revealing for the first time details of the potential killer blow that claimed the life of King Richard III has been released by the University of Leicester.
The sequence - showing the dramatic injury to the base of the skull as well as the inside of the top of the skull - is part of a package of films charting the scientific and archaeological investigations led by the project team from the University of Leicester.
It is among 26 sequences taken by University video producer Carl Vivian who is chronicling the key events in the Discovery, Science and Reburial of the last Plantagenet king. These sequences are accessible to the media by contacting Carl Vivian (details below).
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Viarmes retrouve son château médiéval


Dans le cadre de l'aménagement de la place de la mairie de Viarmes, une fouille archéologique a été prescrite en 2013. Les fouilles ont  permis de mieux comprendre  l'origine du centre ancien de Viarmes en révélant les vestiges oubliés d'un château médiéval et d'un manoir seigneurial détruit au XIVe siècle. 

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Sunday, 18 January 2015

Mysterious medieval fortifications buried in Poland detected with advanced imaging technology


Archaeologists have discovered evidence of unknown medieval fortifications which may indicate the presence of Hussite clashes near a small village in Poland.
Discovered buried in wooded foothills near the village of Bieździadka in south-eastern Poland, the site was examined by archaeologists Joanna Pilszyk and Piotr Szmyd. Based on the report fromScience and Scholarship in Poland (PAP), the fortifications were discovered underground using sophisticated laser detection and aerial mapping.
The fort is to have sat on top of a plateau with steep sides, the sheer slope and height of over two meters (6.5 feet) naturally protecting the stronghold. Moats were believed to surround the site, and high fences or palisades are likely to have run along the perimeter. The age of the fort is not known, but researchers say it was probably built during the Middle Ages.
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Friday, 16 January 2015

"Extremely lucky" archaeologists find evidence of 15th century settlement near Northern Irish castle


Scientific dating leads archaeologists to "extremely exciting" early settlement near ruined 13th century castle


A post-excavation shot of the late 15th or early 16th century structure found near Dunluce Castle, showing the doorway in the corner
© DOE/NIEA

Archaeologists searching for a lost 17th century town say the remains of a fireplace, found in a field near a medieval Irish coastal castle, was part of a previously unknown settlement which could have been established 200 years earlier.

Radiocarbon dating from the clay floor of a structure, discovered by the Northern Ireland Environment Agency, suggests an earlier community could have lived in Dunluce during the late 15th and 16th centuries.

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Monday, 12 January 2015

Archéologie du château de Rodemack, la place-forte aux trois frontières


Les archéologues de l’Inrap fouillent le château de Rodemack, sur prescription de l’État (Drac Lorraine), dans le cadre de sa réhabilitation par la Communauté de communes de Cattenom et environs. Après une opération de quatre mois en 2013, cette seconde campagne de fouille qui démarre, durera jusqu’en octobre 2014. Elle concerne plusieurs zones du château, rénové au XIXe siècle, notamment son noyau originel des XIIe-XIIIe siècles, sur une emprise de 7 500 m2. Place-forte très convoitée, le château de Rodemack est implanté près de trois frontières, celles du duché du Luxembourg, des pays germaniques et du duché de Lorraine. L’archéologie permet de renouveler son histoire et de retracer notamment son riche passé militaire. 


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